New Inventory

Growth of Population, 1947

Erwin J. Raisz (1893-1968) is an American 20th century cartographer who established principles of cartography and of cartographic education in the United States. Raisz (pronounced to sound like "rice") graduated from the Royal Polytechnicum in Budapest in 1914 with a Civil Engineering and Architecture degree. In 1923, Erwin Raisz immigrated to the United States. He worked as a map maker while he also attended Columbia University, in 1929 earning a doctorate in geology with a dissertation entitled "Scenery of Mt.

World War II: European Area, 1947

            Erwin J. Raisz (1893-1968) is an American 20th century cartographer known as the founder of landform principles of cartography and as a pioneer in American cartographic education. Raisz (pronounced to sound like "rice") graduated from the Royal Polytechnicum in Budapest in 1914 with a Civil Engineering and Architecture degree. In 1923, Erwin Raisz immigrated to the United States where he worked as a map maker at the same time attending Columbia University, where he earned his doctorate in geology in 1929 with a dissertation entitled "Scenery of Mt.

Arabia, c. 1850

"Arabia" is fine engraved, colored print and an illustrated map with four vignettes surrounded by a decorative border that exemplifies John Rapkins' elegant and geographically detailed manner of portraying a country or region. Rapkin's drawings and engravings set the standard for illustrated maps of this era.  This example was published in the Universal Pronouncing Dictionary, a massive and elegant  undertaking that presented literature, science,history and geography to present a complete atlas of the world. This five volume work was published in London in 1850.

Map of the Town of Deerfield, 1855

This rare wall map of Deerfield, Massachusetts is a detailed 1855 survey of the town and its villages, an architectural portrait of the fine homes, churches and other establishments in town and a Connecticut River Valley vista that captures the dominant profile of the Connecticut River, its tributary the Deerfield River and the surrounding Pocumtuck hills and mountains. The map and inset maps are drawn at two different scales, both of which permit labeling on the respective map each house or building by name.

Map of Rockingham Co. New Hampshire (1857)

This is the first edition of Chace's survey of Rockingham County drawn from actual surveys at a large scale to permit labeling individual homes, stores, factories and other locations of note. Surrounding the perimeter of the map and joined by decorative bands are 13 pictorial vignettes and two tables. There is a large inset map of Portsmouth City (18 ½" x 12") that includes the Kittery Navy Yard and a large inset map of Exeter Village (15 ½" x 10 ¼") as well as smaller inset maps of each town center in Rockingham County.

New Hampshire, Colton Pocket Map, 1854

This rare Colton pocket map New Hampshire, copyright 1854  presents a compact and detailed description of New Hampshire at the beginning of railroad expansion, industrialization and the growth of population in New Hampshire's major cities and regions to the north due to railroad access. To make the point, Colton's map presents county population statistics for 1840 and 1850 to quantify the influx of new inhabitants and the considerable growth of households in New Hampshire.

Vue du Centre de Paris, 1951

    This is a highly decorative bird's eye view of central Paris ("vue a vol d'oiseau"), printed in French, showing all of the city's important historic buildings, such as the Palais du Justice, the Tour Eiffel, the Place Vendome, Palais Royale, Arc De Triomphe De L'Etoile as well as Paris gardens and parks such as Jardin Des Tuileries. The major train stations are shown. The Seine is filled with boats and ships under sail.

Territory of Alaska, The Alaska Line 1936

      The imagery of this Alaska Lines map is lively and uniquely characteristic of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. The border is composed of colorful wooden totem poles and the animals flanking part of the title include a raised up Alaskan seal and a big black bear. The text of the map is unabashedly proud of the natural resources and beauty of Alaska that the lower 48 has not, as of 1936 generally considered as a travel destination.