New Inventory

Panorama of Washington

This elaborately illustrated color lithograph features a decorated portrait of George Washington, below which unfolds the panorama of Washington, D.C. in 28 small pictorial vignettes, a view of the Capitol building with Thomas Crawford's sculpture "Freedom" atop the dome and 3 color vignettes at the foot that include Lady Liberty with two decidedly American putti, a drawing of the Washington Monument and a scene of George Washington crossing the Delaware River.  Charles Magnus & Co. first published this patriotic work at the outset of the U.S.

New York

This bird's eye view of New York City was drawn by artist Hermann Bollmann to celebrate the 1964 New York World's Fair. His drawing of New York City is based on research that included aerial photography done in preparation for this large scale, detailed map of New York. Bollmann emigrated to the United States from Germany where an earlier, 19th century tradition of angled, aerial views of cities could be found in published maps. He introduced the style of an aerial, angled city view with this map that was seen and used by visitors to the 1964 World's Fair in New York.

Map of the City of Boston, 1910

This detailed street map of the City of Boston and its named neighborhoods, showing also the immediately surrounding towns was published in Boston by Mary Sampson, president of Sampson Publishing Company, a publishing company active in Boston from approximately 1880 to at least 1910. The firm was known as Sampson & Murdock. Sampson was active in the arts and culture of Boston. This Boston map accompanied a Boston street directory produced by William Edwards Murdock.

Colton's Route-Book Through the United States of America and the Canadas, 1850.

This 1850, first edition Colton's Route-Book Through the United States is a book listing all canals, stage roads and rail connections accompanied by several finely detailed maps folded into the book for travelers to see the numbered routes described in the book. The book is divided into sections, from the East Coast to the West Coast.  The train routes between major cities and their respective train stations are named with a separate column showing the route number appearing on the map.  A route guide to California and Utah was novel in 1850.

Douglass' Monthly. November, 1860.

Frederick Douglass (1817-1895) was born a slave in Maryland, escaped to New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1836 and began his career as an abolitionist in 1841 with a speech delivered at an abolitionist convention in Nantucket, Massachusetts.  Douglass' first abolitionist newspaper was The North Star commencing December, 1847 in Rochester, New York.  Between 1851 and 1858 Douglass had editorial control over a larger merged paper. In  1858 Douglass began Douglass' Monthly, a paper concerned exclusively with abolition of slavery in America.

Map of Rockingham Co., New Hampshire, 1857

This is the first edition of Chace's Map of Rockingham Co. New Hampshire From Actual Surveys  drawn at a large scale to permit labeling individual homes, stores, factories and other locations of note. Surrounding the perimeter of the map and joined by decorative bands are 13 pictorial vignettes and two tables. There is a large inset map of Portsmouth City (18 ½" x 12") that includes the Kittery Navy Yard and a large inset map of Exeter Village (15 ½" x 10 ¼") as well as smaller inset maps of each town center in Rockingham County.

Growth of Population, 1947

Erwin J. Raisz (1893-1968) is an American 20th century cartographer who established principles of cartography and of cartographic education in the United States. Raisz (pronounced to sound like "rice") graduated from the Royal Polytechnicum in Budapest in 1914 with a Civil Engineering and Architecture degree. In 1923, Erwin Raisz immigrated to the United States. He worked as a map maker while he also attended Columbia University, in 1929 earning a doctorate in geology with a dissertation entitled "Scenery of Mt.

World War II: European Area, 1947

            Erwin J. Raisz (1893-1968) is an American 20th century cartographer known as the founder of landform principles of cartography and as a pioneer in American cartographic education. Raisz (pronounced to sound like "rice") graduated from the Royal Polytechnicum in Budapest in 1914 with a Civil Engineering and Architecture degree. In 1923, Erwin Raisz immigrated to the United States where he worked as a map maker at the same time attending Columbia University, where he earned his doctorate in geology in 1929 with a dissertation entitled "Scenery of Mt.